Loyola Changing Mascot to Lawn Jockey Wearing an Ascot Over Copyright Concerns

Dax LaCray Lifestyle 1 Comment

SHREVEPORT, La. – The privatest school in Shreveport has lost an ongoing legal battle surrounding its use of Snoopy as mascot after the Schulz family, copyright owners to the popular Peanuts comic and cartoon, filed a suit against the institution. “Man, I liked that cartoon dog a lot,” says Loyola principal John LaBlank. “We keep it creative and quirky at Loyola. For example, we don’t care much for traditional sports, we are all about lacrosse – which, did you know is much more physical than football and requires much more technical skill? Not sure if you knew that, but now you do, so basically it’s better than football. With that being said, we took that outside-the-box-thinking into mascot selection. We are the Flyers and Snoopy is a flying ace. It was a perfect match.”

The ruling means that Loyola had to find a new mascot that similarly represents its values like Snoopy the Flying Ace did for so many years. “Look at the majestic lawn jockey wearing an ascot. See his nose tilted to the sky? That’s a sign of confidence that we feel really punctuates what it’s like to graduate from Loyola and move into the real world. The ascot is really icing on the cake, as the ascot 100 years ago is a lot like the Croakies of today,” says LaBlank.

“We aren’t stepping on any toes with this one, you can tell this just looks like a respectable fraternity pledge. If he has any balls he will pledge Kappa Sig at Tulane.”

Some parents from around Shreveport are surprisingly supportive of the change. “My kid wanted to go there because of the stupid Snoopy mascot. I guess he thinks Snoopy is actually there or something. I don’t have $50,000 to send my kid to high school. Looks like her will be going to Byrd or Triple C instead,” says one parent.

The lawn jockey is expected to debut at the start of 2018’s fall classes. “We were paying attention when LSUS showed off that grassy monster or weed nugget or whatever it is. We want to draw that same sort of attention, so stay tuned,” finishes LaBlank.